North American Countries

Barbados Shopping

DUTY-FREE SHOPPING

Overview

The following items can be imported into Barbados duty-free in hand luggage (people over 18 years of age):

200 cigarettes or 100 cigars or 230 grams of tobacco products;
1 l of spirits;
a small amount of perfume or a reasonable amount of eau de toilette for personal use;
Souvenirs up to a value of 100 BDS $.

Import regulations

An import permit is required for weapons (including alarm pistols, diving pistols and boat signal pistols).

Prohibited imports

Drugs of all kinds, meat and meat products, foreign rum, fresh fruit and utensils (e.g. bags and clothing) made from camouflage material.

ECONOMY

Business etiquette

Tropical suits or shirts and ties are appropriate. The customs among business people are very similar to those in Europe, for example exchanging business cards.

Business hours:
Mon-Fri 8 a.m.-4 p.m.

Economy

Barbados Chamber of Commerce and Industry (Chamber of Commerce)
Braemar Court, Deighton Road, St. Michael
Tel: (246) 620 47 50
Internet: www.bdscham.com

Barbados Investment & Development Corporation (Investment and Development Corporation)
PO Box 1250 Pelican House, Princess Alice Highway, Bridgetown
Tel: 427 53 50.
Internet: www.bidc.com

Business contacts

Barbados Chamber of Commerce and Industry (Chamber of Commerce)
Braemar Court, Deighton Road, St. Michael
Tel: (246) 620 47 50
Internet: www.bdscham.com

Barbados Investment & Development Corporation (Investment and Development Corporation)
PO Box 1250 Pelican House, Princess Alice Highway, Bridgetown
Tel: 427 53 50.
Internet: www.bidc.com

COMMUNICATION

Phone

International direct dialing; international code for international calls from Barbados: 011.

Cellphone

TDMA and GSM 900 cellular network is operated by Cable & Wireless Barbados (Internet: www.cwc.com).

Internet

There are around 20 internet cafes in Barbados. One of the main Internet providers is Sunbeach (Internet: www.sunbeach.net).

Post Office

Delivery in Bridgetown twice a day, once in rural areas. The red mailboxes are everywhere. The main post office in Bridgetown opens Mon-Fri 8 a.m.-5 p.m., other post offices open Mon 7:30 a.m.-12 p.m. and 1 p.m.-3 p.m., Tues-Fri 8 a.m.-12 p.m. and 1 p.m.-3.15 p.m.

Radio

Since the use of shortwave frequencies changes several times over the course of a year, it is advisable to contact Deutsche Welle customer service directly (Tel: (+49) (0228) 429 32 08. Internet: www.dw-world.de) to request.

SHOP

Overview

According to elaineqho, Barbados is a country in Central America. Barbados has been a trading center since the 17th century and today has excellent business relationships with the other Caribbean islands. High quality, yet inexpensive goods and excellent service make shopping, especially on Broad Street, Bridgetown’s main shopping street, a real pleasure in this East Caribbean tax haven. Many items can be bought duty-free on presentation of a flight ticket and passport. As a result, the prices are not the cheapest, but often 30 to 50% cheaper than in Europe or North America. The international goods on offer, from jewelry, watches, clothing, crystal glass and porcelain, are of high quality, which makes shopping worthwhile.

Rum, straw work, coral jewelry, batik fabrics, colorfully printed cotton fabrics, hand-made pottery and wood carvings are the best souvenirs. Craft and gift stores are located in the Pelican Craft Center, on the outskirts of Bridgetown, as well as in Holetown, Speighstown and St Lawrence Gap. Crane Village on the southeastern coast is one of the most modern and elegant shopping paradises on the island, and there are also some duty-free shops here. The exquisite shops in the Limegrove Lifeytle Center (Internet: www.limegrove.com) in Holetown, which opened in 2011, also promise a luxurious shopping experience.

Opening hours

Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 8.30 a.m.-1 p.m. or 2 p.m. Some shops, often including the supermarkets, are open until 6 or 9 p.m. on weekdays and until 3.30 p.m. on Saturdays.

Barbados Shopping

NIGHTLIFE

Introduction

In the West Indies people like to party a lot and have plenty of opportunities to do so in nightclubs, discos, bars or directly on the beach. Entertainment offers from limbo to fire-eaters and steel bands to dance bands are everywhere. Most of the bands play calypso and reggae, a few also excellent rhythm ‘n’ blues. Often a (relatively inexpensive) entry fee is required. As everywhere in the Caribbean, entertainment venues open and close depending on the season. Boat trips (fun cruises) along the coast are very popular, departures are usually twice a day, and there are various entertainment programs, buffets and bars on board. Caribbean dinner shows are well attended and usually feature steel bands, men dancing on stilts, barbecues and (free) drinks until the wee hours of the morning.

Most of the nightlife options can be found along the southern and western coasts. St Lawrence Gap in Christ Church Parish, also known as ” The Gap, ” has the most vibrant and diverse nightlife on the island; numerous bars, pubs and clubs are lined up in one street. If you want to party with the locals, you should visit the fish market in Oistins on Friday or Saturday evenings, where Barbadians dance until the early hours of the morning to country, western and the latest calypso sounds.