Parvovirosis Canina: An Infection That Can Affect Your Dog

The Parvovirus canine is a viral infection that affects mainly dogs, and them causes, mainly gastrointestinal disturbances. This disease is highly contagious and causes severe disease in dogs young so it is important to know how to identify the first signs in order to intervene as soon as possible. Learn more about the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

Parvovirosis Canina An Infection That Can Affect Your Dog

The Parvovirus canine is a viral infection is potentially fatal that affects mostly puppies or adult dogs not vaccinated. It is highly contagious and is a common cause of intestinal disease acute. You may want to know how to identify the early signs to be able to act as soon as possible.

THE ETIOLOGY OF PARVOVIROSE

WHAT IS

The Parvovirus canine is caused by the parvovirus , canine CPV-2, being that there are several variants of this strain. This is a virus that is highly resistant to most detergents and disinfectants in common, as well as the temperature changes.

As such, the virus can persist in indoor environments with room temperature for more than 2 months, and on the outside, the case is protected from sun exposure, persists for months to years.

ANIMALS MOST SUSCEPTIBLE

Animals with a higher risk of catching Parvo are puppies (6 weeks to 6 months of age) that are not vaccinated, however adults have not been vaccinated may also become infected, but the clinical manifestation will be, at the outset, the more smoothly.

The breeds of Rottweiler, Dobermann Pinschers, Pit Bull, Terrier the American, English Springer Spaniel and the German Shepherd were described as being more prone to develop the disease.

Dogs that have suckled mothers previously vaccinated or immunity before the virus, are protected by the antibodies passed through the milk only during the first few weeks of life.

TRANSMISSION

The virus is transmitted through direct contact with contaminated feces of the dog. The indirect transmission, as for example by means of objects (shoes, gloves, equipment) that have been in contact with the feces, are also one of the main sources of infection.

The virus begins to be excreted in the faeces of infected dogs 4 to 5 days after they have been exposed to the virus (usually even before the clinical signs become manifest) and persists until about 10 days after the recovery clinic. Or, your dog may be in contact with another dog that is excrete the parvovirus without anyone noticing and taking the appropriate isolation precautions.

THE EVOLUTION OF THE DISEASE

After entering the body through the mouth and/or nose, the virus multiplies and spreads through the bloodstream. Goes and attacks preferentially the cells that have a high rate of division, in particular the bone marrow, the tissue producer of blood cells and the inside of the small intestine.

The production of the virus in the gut cause damage and loss of integrity of the cells, which will allow the bacteria that are naturally present in the intestinal contents to pass into the blood, exacerbating the situation.

The fact that the bone marrow be affected will also decrease the body’s ability to fight infection (because there is less production of white blood cells).

These factors combined favor the emergence of bacterial infections that are secondary.
In puppies infected in utero or under 8 weeks of life, the virus may also move to the heart, may cause heart failure, without manifesting the changes of the digestive tract.

SINAIS CLÍNICOS DA PARVOVIROSE

The clinical signs of Parvo usually appear 5 to 7 days after infection, and they may begin to be nonspecific, such as depression, loss of appetite, and fever (41-42 ° C) and progress to vomiting and for the characteristic diarrhea with blood in 1 to 2 days.

Abdominal pain may also be present and is indicative of that the intestines may have become blocked, which constitutes a medical emergency.

There are animals in which the infection seems to not cause major changes, but there are others whose clinical picture may deteriorate rapidly and die due to severe dehydration and the complications resulting from dissemination of the bacteria by the body.

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